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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Yield loss assessment in nonprotected winter wheat varieties (Triticum aestivum, L. em Thell) found in the catalog.

Yield loss assessment in nonprotected winter wheat varieties (Triticum aestivum, L. em Thell)

Miguel Alfonso Camacho Casas

Yield loss assessment in nonprotected winter wheat varieties (Triticum aestivum, L. em Thell)

by Miguel Alfonso Camacho Casas

  • 301 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wheat -- Disease and pest resistance.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Miguel Alfonso Camacho-Casas.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[13], 86 leaves, bound ;
    Number of Pages86
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14272277M

    Zymoseptoria tritici is the causative fungal pathogen of septoria tritici blotch (STB) disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that continuously threatens wheat crops in Ireland and throughout Europe. Under favorable conditions, STB can cause up to 50% yield losses if left untreated. STB is commonly controlled with fungicides; however, a combination of Z. tritici populations developing   Soft red winter wheat is a critical component of a corn-soybean-wheat rotational system that is important for sustainable agriculture in the North Central region. However, the maintenance of wheat in the rotation is very cost-dependent. Hence, cost-effective pest management through IPM will be critical for sustainable wheat production in the North Central ://

      Zhou Shunli, Zhang Fusuo, Wang Xingren, Study on differences in nitrogen nutrition between winter wheat varieties in response, uptake to nitrogen and associated depletion of soil nitrate, Scientia Agricultura Sinica, , 35(6): – (In Chinese) Google Scholar   Crop yields are projected to decrease under future climate conditions, and recent research suggests that yields have already been impacted. However, current impacts on a diversity of crops subnationally and implications for food security remains unclear. Here, we constructed linear regression relationships using weather and reported crop data to assess the potential impact of observed climate ?id=/

    South Africa: Both facultative winter wheat and spring bread wheat cultivars have been widely grown in South Africa, more than a decade ago, currently spring wheat varieties are the dominant type of wheat produced in South Africa. Popular older winter and facultative varieties (Betta, Belinda, Molen, PAN, PAN, SST, SST, SST and   plants usually produce smaller kernels. Yield loss can reach 50% in highly susceptible varieties. Management: 1) Wheat varieties resistant to tan spot are available and effective in managing the disease. 2) Reduced tillage cropping system stands have an increased tan spot risk due to the psuedothecia on stubble and ://?filename=22&article=&context.


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Yield loss assessment in nonprotected winter wheat varieties (Triticum aestivum, L. em Thell) by Miguel Alfonso Camacho Casas Download PDF EPUB FB2

Yield loss assessment in nonprotected winter wheat varieties (Triticum aestivum, L. em Thell) some soil- and foliar-borne biotic factors on\ud grain yield and the components of yield were evaluated using five\ud winter wheat varieties sown at two dates.

Within each planting date,\ud varieties were grown under four different combinations of Exploring the impacts of climate change on agriculture is one of important topics with respect to climate change. We quantitatively examined the impacts of climate change on winter wheat yield in Northern China using the Cobb–Douglas production function.

Utilizing time-series data of agricultural production and meteorological observations from tothe impacts of climatic factors on   a) Recorded winter wheat yield anomalies (blue) and simulated yield anomalies (red line) using the MCYFS. b) Percentage of winter wheat area in the Czech Republic affected by adverse weather events during different crop growth stages (Trnka et al.,and Table S3 in supplemental material for additional information on the definition of   a Isolation for the same or higher category of the same species; 2 to 4 m for other species and m for a field of the same species with percent of smut for pre-baisc seed, percent for basic seed, percent for certified 1 seed and percent for certified 2 seed.

b Impurities of other crop species refers to all cereal species other than the crop in question (e.g. in bread wheat Wheat germination requires temperatures ideally between 12°C and 25°C, however germination will still occur between 4°C and 37°C.

Germination will occur more quickly with consecutive warm days. Frosts at the time of flowering can cause florets to be sterile leading to high yield losses. Varieties   No varieties are frost tolerant however wheat and barley varieties do differ in susceptibility to reproductive frost damage during Yield loss assessment in nonprotected winter wheat varieties book and flowering.

Its important to note that there is no point selecting less susceptible varieties for the whole cropping program if there is an opportunity cost of lower yield without ://?nopaging=1. All varieties of HRW wheat. Soft red winter (SRW) wheat.

All varieties of SRW wheat. Hard white (HW) wheat. All hard endosperm white wheat varieties. Soft white (SW) wheat. All soft endosperm white wheat varieties. It contains three subclasses: (a) Soft white wheat.

Soft endosperm white wheat varieties which contain less than 10% white   Wheat varieties susceptible to leaf rust enable inoculum levels to build up on volunteers during the summer and autumn.

This can be a problem in seasons following wet summers that favour the growth of self-sown wheat. Plants that become heavily infected with rust in the autumn provide a source of rust for the new season's wheat :// /grain-pulses-and-cereal-diseases/leaf-rust-of-wheat.

Stripe rust of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis f. tritici reduced kernel mass and the number of kernels per head in field epidemics from to in southern New South Wales. These epidemics began at the stem elongation stage of growth in and at booting to heading stages in the other years.

The effects were greatest in very susceptible cultivars when the epidemic began before 2 days ago  Frost occurs on clear nights in early spring when the air temperature drops to 2°C or less.

Crop damage from frost may occur at any stage of development but is most damaging at or around flowering. Currently growers don't have management or genetic strategies that ensures complete frost tolerance, however there's various risk management options that have been proven to reduce frost :// Similar estimates of temperature impacts on global wheat yield by three independent methods Article (PDF Available) in Nature Climate Change 6(12) September with 2, Reads There are a number of spring wheat varieties that offer some resistance to this disease.

However, the winter wheat cultivars presently registered for production in western Canada only have poor to fair common root rot resistance and none of the winter wheat breeding programs in western Canada are actively selecting for resistance to this   Introduction.

Forage grasslands are used to feed livestock and globally it has been estimated that they represent 26% of the land area, and 70% of agricultural area ().Such crops are significant economically, as the European example shows (see Figure Figure1 1).Forage crops are usually grasses (Poaceae) or herbaceous legumes (Fabaceae).Some tree legumes such as mulga (Acacia aneura) Wheat varieties vary in their sensitivity to metribuzin, so consult seed company information before use.

We discourage application of 2,4-D to emerged wheat in the fall due to the risk of injury and yield reduction, and most labels do not list this use. Fall application of dicamba has not caused injury or yield loss in our research ://   This is likely to have been due to frost induced sterility.

In comparison to the wheat varieties listed, the early to mid maturing barley varieties were still able to achieve comparatively good yields (~ t/ha) from a very late sowing opportunity (July 4). Table 3.

Grain yield of selected wheat varieties sown at four sowing times at Narrabri /grdc-update-papers//03/barley-agronomy-and-varieties. The yield of commercial durum wheat varieties and inbred lines under warm and dry Mediterranean environments has been shown to be determined mostly by the number of spikes per unit area, whereas grain weight predominantly influences the yield in cool and wet environments (García del Moral et al., ; Royo et al., ).

Effects of winter wheat cultivars and seed rate on the biological characteristics of naturally occurring weed flora. Weed Res. 42 – /jx ; Lemerle D., Verbeek B., Cousens R.

D., Coombes N. The potential for selecting wheat varieties   The aim of this study was to determine the loss in wheat yield due to competition from five winter weed species. Method Competitiveness of five emerging weed species (great brome, barley grass, doublegee, sowthistle and wireweed) were tested against a wheat crop growing on a sandy soil at the DPIRD Wongan Hills Research Station in //02/competitiveness-of-emerging-weed-species-in-a-wheat-crop.

Contamination of wheat with common bunt spores has resulted in considerable loss of yield and seed quality accompanied by a fish-like odor 1, 2. Typically, yield loss is proportional to disease The model predicted that due to climate change, the wheat yield would be reduced by to % in the medium term from –, and it further predicted that winter wheat productions would decrease by to % by the end of the century.

In China, researchers reported that wheat production rates would be reduced by 3 to 10% due to a. Trends in (A) mean optimum N applied at a N:grain price ratio of 5, (B) mean grain yield at optimum N, and (C) mean NUE at optimum N for varieties of winter wheat according to their date of first listing.

Data are from 39 N response experiments in harvest years –  yielding varieties will be a step towards agricultural transformation in Africa. Africa faces a wide range of challenges in the production of the five major cereals considered in this Work Stream - rice, maize, millet, sorghum and ://Late spring drought is particularly damaging for spring wheat because, unlike winter wheat, roots in spring wheat are not well developed at that time thus restricting access to water from the deeper soil layers.

In some regions of Poland, up to 30% yield loss was observed in extreme drought (Doroszewski et al. ). Hence, breeding for both